Easy Moroccan fried soles

Fried fish is a favourite street food in Morocco, especially in coastal cities. It’s so common to find a dish of fried fish along with a fresh tomato and onion salad in many traditional restaurants.

Fried soles usually are served with fried whiting and calamari rings, lemon wedges and a hot fried chilli for garnish, next to a fresh salad and a cold drink. Who wouldn’t want that.

The common soles in Morocco are medium-size to small. When fried, you get a crispy outside especially around the edges and a soft inside. Quite a nice contrast of textures.

Sometimes, these fried fish dishes are served as a starter or along vegetarian starters with pulses (white bean in red sauce, lentils or black-eyed peas). This combo used to be a cheap meal for anyone but packed with a lot of nutrients. That was before the fish has become a bit pricey.

Ingredients
Serves 4 to 6
Prep: 15 min – Frying: about 4 min/batch

  •  1 1/2 kg of soles
  • Salt and pepper for the fish and for the flour coating
  • 3 cups of flour
  • 1 cup of fine semolina flour (optional, for more crispiness)
  • Vegetable oil for frying

 

Moroccan fried fish without chermoula
Moroccan fried fish without chermoula marinade. Credit @Nada Kiffa

Preparation

Wash the soles, discard the heard. Set aside to drain and pat dry.

Season the fish with salt and pepper. Add some salt and pepper to the flour mix as well and coat each sole with it a couple of times from all sides. Pat it between your hands to get rid of excess flour.

Over medium heat the frying oil in a deep frying pan. Shallow-fry the soles, leaving space between each fish to flip it around.

It should take about 4 minutes for each bach to be cooked through. Place each fried fish in a strainer for a couple of minutes then place it on a piece of kitchen roll.

Serve warm with lemon wedges or slices, a Moroccan tomato and onion salad and a spicy tomato and harissa sauce (check link for the recipe).

Author: Nada

Nada Kiffa is an Expert in Moroccan cooking and her recipes are coming from a lineage of Moroccan home and professional cooks. Cooking classes and posted articles are inspired by her family life in Morocco and elsewhere. You will learn what makes a dish Moroccan before learning how to execute it. You will also learn how to work around recipes and cut corners without missing on the flavour.

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