Aniseed pressed biscuits – Bechkitou be nafa’ – Spritz

Aniseed pressed biscuits are yummy little things dating from my childhood. But while living in Germany I discovered that they’re a big deal especially during this season.

They’re commonly called Spritz and are quite famous in France, Germany and Austria, not to mention the many countries who have adopted them, for a good reason: they’re buttery, they just need a few ingredients (the usual available stuff), not expensive to make. I mean, it’s just the perfect biscuit with a hot drink (or cold milk for children).

I’m keeping the decoration simple, just as I remember them when I was a child

Spritz biscuits come in different shapes. Most of them are shaped using a cookie-press or a meat grinder fitted with special nozzles. In case you have none, a piping bag fitted with the right tip will do (usually a star tip).

If you don’t like the anise flavour, use vanilla or lemon zest..

Ingredients
Makes 50 ish
Prep: 30 min –  Baking: 12- 15 min

  • 180g butter, at room temperature
  • 80g icing sugar 
  • 1 pinch of salt 
  • 1 heaped tsp of anise, toasted and coarsly ground (just to intensify the flavour)
  • 1 egg 
  •  230g of flour, sifted
 

I left some anise seeds in..I like it that way

Preparation
Place the butter in the bowl of a mixer and beat until creamy. Add sugar, salt and egg. Mix until all ingredients are combined then add the rest of the ingredients. Mix again at low speed until the flour is fully incorporated.
 
Preheat oven at 180 ° C and cover the baking sheets with baking paper.
Pass the dough through the press to shape the biscuits. Press them directly onto the baking sheets. Leave about 5 cm between each biscuits as they tend to spread a bit. 
I sprinkled these with those tiny candies
Bake for 12 to 15 min until golden from the edges.
Transfer the biscuits to a wire rack to cool.
Store in a cookie box for up to a week.
The humble biscuits..yet very satisfying..

Author: Nada

Nada Kiffa is an Expert in Moroccan cooking and her recipes are coming from a lineage of Moroccan home and professional cooks. Cooking classes and posted articles are inspired by her family life in Morocco and elsewhere. You will learn what makes a dish Moroccan before learning how to execute it. You will also learn how to work around recipes and cut corners without missing on the flavour.

2 thoughts

  1. I was scared to use my cookie press (I bought it 4 years ago) and I must admit it's a good one..The previous ones were a disaster..I'm just going to read your post about Anisgrisar now 🙂

  2. I love my cookie press… though I must admit I use only one or two of the templates. No idea where it is now either… must have been packed away somewhere when I moved but I'll find it some time! Lovely looking biscuits – like the aniseed… I'll be posting something next week with aniseed in too I think!

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